Peter Rüedi

Organophosphorous Chemistry and Phytochemistry

Peter Rüedi was born 1944 in Lucerne (Switzerland) where he had the elementary and high school education. 
He studied chemistry with specialization in organic chemistry at the University of Zurich. After a diploma (master) thesis on isolation and stuctural elucidation (1969) of a natural pigment he completed a PhD thesis on structural and synthetic aspects of physiologically active plant constituents (1972). Since 1975 Peter Rüedi has been associated with the Institute of Organic Chemistry as lecturer, after his habilitation as Privatdozent and lateron was appointed Titularprofessor.

Our research activities focus on two main subjects: 

a) Organophosphorous chemistry: Regio- and Stereochemistry of the Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase and Related Serine-Hydrolases by Organophosphorous Acetylcholine Mimetics.

b) Phytochemistry: Physiologically Active Constituents from Medicinal Plants: Multiple Biological Screening, Bioactivity Guided Isolation, Synthetic and Stereochemical Aspects.

Both main topics have a direct link to life sciences' problems. The general goal is to contribute to the understanding of chemical reaction mechanisms, in particular molecular interactions which are the basis of essential physiological processes. Main emphasis is placed on stereochemical implications of enzymatic reaction pathways. The key steps for these investigations are efficient syntheses of enantiomerically pure novel compounds and the broad application of enzyme kinetics and spectroscopic methods, in particular 31P-NMR spectroscopy. 

Research

Our research activities focus on two main subjects:

a) Organophosphorous chemistry: Regio- and Stereochemistry of the Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase and Related Serine-Hydrolases by Organophosphorous Acetylcholine Mimetics.

b) Phytochemistry: Physiologically Active Constituents from Medicinal Plants: Multiple Biological Screening, Bioactivity Guided Isolation, Synthetic and Stereochemical Aspects.

Both main topics have a direct link to life sciences' problems. The general goal is to contribute to the understanding of chemical reaction mechanisms, in particular molecular interactions which are the basis of essential physiological processes. Main emphasis is placed on stereochemical implications of enzymatic reaction pathways. The key steps for these investigations are efficient syntheses of enantiomerically pure novel compounds and the broad application of enzyme kinetics and spectroscopic methods, in particular 31P-NMR spectroscopy.

For all further information visit the group's home page.

Publications and Projects